Home Buyers – How to Read the Termite Inspection Report

Young woman reading notebook, looking confused

Your termite inspection report isn’t as confusing as you think. Credit: CollegeDegrees360, Flickr

If you’ve discovered your dream home here in San Diego or San Diego County, you want to make sure the home is as beautiful and solid below the surface as it is on the outside. That is why sellers are required to have a termite inspector inspect the home before the sale can proceed. As a home buyer, it is important for you to be able to accurately read the termite inspection report, so that any immediate problems can be addressed and you can understand what future issues may lie ahead.

What Termite Inspectors Look For

It may surprise you to know that the termite inspection doesn’t just look for termites. In fact, the inspector’s job is to look for anything that could damage your home. This includes dry rot, fungus, and leaks. The inspector will also point out infestations other than termites, such as carpenter ants and many different types of wood destroying beetles.

If any of these things comes up on your report, you definitely want to negotiate with the seller to try and get them to fix those issues as part of the sale.

Section 1 and Section 2 Repairs

When you receive your termite inspection report, carefully review Section 1 Repairs, and Section 2 Repairs. This is where you’ll find all of the issues the termite inspector discovered. Section 1 Repairs refer to all of the most pressing issues, like an active infestation, that need to be handled immediately. Section 2 Repairs are areas of concern that may one day be an issue that needs to be taken care of. Typically Section 2 Repairs don’t need to be addressed right away, but homeowners are encouraged to keep their eye on it.

In a home buying scenario, sellers are usually in charge of fixing anything listed in the Section 1 Repairs. Section 2 Repairs usually fall to the buyer, since they are not immediate problems. As a buyer, you want to make sure that the seller agrees to pay for all Section 1 Repairs, and you need to be aware of Section 2 Repairs, because these may result in high costs for you in the future.

Your Termite Clearance

If the inspection doesn’t find any immediate issues, the inspector will issue a Termite Clearance, which basically says that the home does not have termites. Certain mortgage lenders require a termite clearance before they will approve a mortgage.

California Real Estate rules are always changing check with your Lic. Real Estate agent for profession advise on your transaction.

If you are in the market to sell or buy a home in San Diego, Best-Rate Termite provides termite inspections and termite exterminations. Give us a call to schedule an inspection today.